Ori poem

A poem in Ori. I use poetry to expand on my lexicon and grammar, as well as invent new ways of doing metaphor.

~

Clidolyal

Catyin-gae nalistityin tyae

Calin natin nalepa can iyutu cyan

Yullacu tyuhacu

Bane cohace

Nye nalemasye

 

Catyin eltrutyin tyae

Na lyen-tatyin tyo

Ilu cyalace

Na syutace

Milis cuheo bumi

Na misuhile lunin cyon-lastilen

Bine

Nyilleya hatanulya.

 

 

A false vow

But you knew my reasons

You never saw me how you should

Every year

We would slip further

From the truth.

 

You know my ways

And I know yours

We come together again

And split apart

A tree cloven in two

And from the sap running from our wounds

Perhaps

A new story.

Legend and Lore: The children of Hestaya (a poem)

In Orikrindian myth, Hestaya (the mother goddess, the goddess of the mountains and earth) bore 12 infants, which were conceived beneath the hardest rock in the earth, fathered by the fire god, whose life blood flows under the world as magma. The twelve children were born upon twelve hills that encircle the island of Orikrindia. In legend, the children were found by nomads of a group called the Lost Ones. The queen of this people, Crestellin, was the first to find one of these children, and then, one by one, she and her handmaidens found all twelve. She was a childless queen before this moment, but adopted the babies into her family and raised them as her own. According to legend, these demigod children grew into the founders of the twelve great cities of Orikrindia.

This poem is about Crestellin finding the first of the children of Hestaya.

~

Moving like a green snake

In the dewdrops

A fragmented line of tiny sighs

Blooming life along the dusty horizon.

 

Clinging still to mother

Unwilling to relinquish

That summer warm smell

Of newborns and flowers and vegetables

Singing in the sweltering heat

Humming with an old life

 

You know who they were

The ones who came before

The earthy faces digging themselves out from under hills and mounds

Stones in the dusk

In the distance,

They approached

Farther and farther

Until we heard their breath

Whispering and scraping in the evening air

Like leaves against your cheek.

 

We took them in

Opened our wings

And drew in these

Infants.

 

We gave them the instincts

We had left,

Pretending

To be mothers

Pretending

To understand beyond the eons

What we were doing.

 

The children of the stone

The babies found

In the earth                            

Creeping into humanity

Latching onto a nipple

They were lucky to find

 

Vines covering the tomb

An ancient space

Threshold to a world beyond

We remained and named the children

After the wish of the Mother,

Hestaya.

 

~

Mintaka

 

Poem to Moltirin, Orikrindian Goddess of the Forest

Mystic-Gothic-Sea-Fantasy-Statue-Dark-Forest-1305040.jpg

Poem about the Orikrindian goddess of the forest. I don’t have enough of the Ori language done yet to translate it BUT it still spoke loudly so I had to do it.

Moltirin (known alsois the Orikrindian goddess of forests, mysteries, vengence, the past, memory, and rebirth/reawakening. She is also the matron goddess of lost things, women who have died in childbirth, dead children, men who have died in battle, storms, and those who have been wronged.

the woman of the wood

the threads of days past

she weaves again

a whisper from before

taken up again

bright and vital in memory

damp with energy refound

glowing in the night

alight with vigor

surging forth once more

pulsing in the rain

dancing beneath the arms of trees.

 

and her eyes

lit like lodestones

a stormy blue

and shot through with light

like yesterday

the dust of an eon

settled and reformed

again we have awoken

the woman of the wood.

~

Mintaka

Upcoming works are brewing…

I’m writing some mini-stories about Orikrindians that I will probably post in the future. Topics may/will include:

– An Orikrindian girl who leaves her country at age 15 and moves to Quarios, some of her thoughts, motivations, and memories (telling her story in retrospect)

– Two Orikrindian brothers who are separated due to a war with a neighboring country

– A story of the devotees of the mountain goddess and fire god who go on a pilgrimage to a great mountain. Fewer will descend that those who went up

I’m also recording new poems in Rílin now, since I am finally back in touch with my h4n Zoom audio recorder, which is higher quality than my laptop mic, unsurprisingly.

Other topics in the works: more Ori grammar, the Orikrindian pantheon, and info on Orikrindian artisanal works.

This has been a semi-update with a bunch of teasers…but I’m really excited about what I’m working on so it’s ok. 😛

Mintaka

A song in Rílin (Bve Pfa R̂í)

So this is a song I recorded a long time ago (like ten years ago lol) that I wrote even longer ago in Old Rílin and Rílin. I was originally inspired by the lush vegetation in southern Georgia when I was visiting there a long while ago. The first verse is in Old Rílin and the rest in Rílin. I imagine it could be from the perspective of a Ríla visiting a southern country (as they are native to the northern half of Izoi and thus would not have experience with certain types of biomes, perhaps being very impressed by certain plants and trees as I was).
Composition, vocals, and lyrics are all by me. Piano arrangement and performance credit goes to Eric Barker (www.ericbarker.com).

http://www.whitealicemusic.com/music/BvePfaRi.mp3

Lyrics are below:

 

Bve Pfa R̂í

(old Rílin)

 

Bve Pfa R̂í

/bve pfa ʂi/

tree blue yearn

‘yearning green’

 

Goxe

/goxe/

stir

‘stirring’

 

bi-ly

/bi’ly/

seed-push

‘seeds springing forth’

 

bil-i

/bi’li/

innerground-wet

‘moist soil’

 

naqa r̂í

/naqa ʂi/

gentle yearn

‘gentle yearning’

 

na genk

inf sleep

‘to sleep’

 

re kanad

/ɾe kanad/

out.of forest

‘out of the forest’

 

be

/be/

smile

‘a smile’

 

(modern Rílin)

 

Phala tösh

/ɸa-la tøʃ/

air-instr ash

Ash in the air

 

Aghu

/aɣu/

Blind

 

Wunís myrûí

/wunis myɾʌi/

breath burning

Breath burning

 

(instrumental)

 

pilu ní

/pɪlu ni/

center.of.flower clear

Clear center of a flower

 

uka

/uka/

Companion

 

Be ŕíky zöet

/bɛ ʐi-ky zø-ɛt/

neg expel-imp trust-abs

don’t expel trust

 

Despyxa

/dɛspyxa/

Paper of tissue

 

Moías

/mɔias/

Tapestry

 

Kaíkr̂ŭ ŝala

/kaikʂɯ ʃa-la/

warmth.from.light petal-instr

Warm light through the petals