Ideas on Ori names

Playing with an idea that in Orikrindia, there is a kind of superstitious tendency to name a child the opposite of what the parents wish for it to become (maybe just in certain classes or subcultures?). For example, Elucuna’s name essentially means “decider”, and her parents definitely did not intend for her to be deciding much in life. Maybe someone hoping for an outgoing child would name him Pilucya ‘timid’. Kind of like avoidance of a jinx by giving a child too “fortuitous” a name and attracting the attentions of an ill-meaning demon. The Orikrindians do feel quite a bit of discomfort with regard to demons…

Elucuna in Quarios (pt 2)

More of the story of Elucuna, a runaway Orikrindian woman who goes into hiding in Quarios to start a new life.

 

It was from there that I made my way to what I had long planned would be my destination. First, I navigated the cramped streets and alleys of Naeglitan to a man who was an acquaintance of my brother’s. His name was Glohitan and he was in the business of ground transport—whether of cargo or person, he did not care. Moreover, he was in the business of discreet transport, which was of utmost concern to me, as I did not wish for my family (other than, of course, Poltyar my brother) to get wind of my location in Quarios, or even that I had in fact fled there. For all they knew, I had perished in some dark wood of Orikrindia or fallen in the hands of highwaymen.

Continue reading “Elucuna in Quarios (pt 2)”

Story: Elucuna in Quarios

This is the beginning of story (of indeterminate length so far) told by an Orikrindian woman who leaves Orikrindia at age 15 and comes to Quarios to be able to pursue a life a greater liberty (Orikrindian society doesn’t offer a lot of independence or a very wide array of options for the future of a yong woman). Like I said, I still don’t know what’s in store for this story, how well I’ll end up liking it, how well anyone else will end up liking it, etc. If you DO want to see more, I’ll probably consider continuing it. Its main purpose now is to help me explore Orikrindian vs Quariosian (i.e. Gotevian and Lomi) cultures, as well as a peak into some other Aeniithian cultures/people/stuff. 😀

Continue reading “Story: Elucuna in Quarios”

Upcoming works are brewing…

I’m writing some mini-stories about Orikrindians that I will probably post in the future. Topics may/will include:

– An Orikrindian girl who leaves her country at age 15 and moves to Quarios, some of her thoughts, motivations, and memories (telling her story in retrospect)

– Two Orikrindian brothers who are separated due to a war with a neighboring country

– A story of the devotees of the mountain goddess and fire god who go on a pilgrimage to a great mountain. Fewer will descend that those who went up

I’m also recording new poems in Rílin now, since I am finally back in touch with my h4n Zoom audio recorder, which is higher quality than my laptop mic, unsurprisingly.

Other topics in the works: more Ori grammar, the Orikrindian pantheon, and info on Orikrindian artisanal works.

This has been a semi-update with a bunch of teasers…but I’m really excited about what I’m working on so it’s ok. 😛

Mintaka

A song in Rílin (Bve Pfa R̂í)

So this is a song I recorded a long time ago (like ten years ago lol) that I wrote even longer ago in Old Rílin and Rílin. I was originally inspired by the lush vegetation in southern Georgia when I was visiting there a long while ago. The first verse is in Old Rílin and the rest in Rílin. I imagine it could be from the perspective of a Ríla visiting a southern country (as they are native to the northern half of Izoi and thus would not have experience with certain types of biomes, perhaps being very impressed by certain plants and trees as I was).
Composition, vocals, and lyrics are all by me. Piano arrangement and performance credit goes to Eric Barker (www.ericbarker.com).

http://www.whitealicemusic.com/music/BvePfaRi.mp3

Lyrics are below:

 

Bve Pfa R̂í

(old Rílin)

 

Bve Pfa R̂í

/bve pfa ʂi/

tree blue yearn

‘yearning green’

 

Goxe

/goxe/

stir

‘stirring’

 

bi-ly

/bi’ly/

seed-push

‘seeds springing forth’

 

bil-i

/bi’li/

innerground-wet

‘moist soil’

 

naqa r̂í

/naqa ʂi/

gentle yearn

‘gentle yearning’

 

na genk

inf sleep

‘to sleep’

 

re kanad

/ɾe kanad/

out.of forest

‘out of the forest’

 

be

/be/

smile

‘a smile’

 

(modern Rílin)

 

Phala tösh

/ɸa-la tøʃ/

air-instr ash

Ash in the air

 

Aghu

/aɣu/

Blind

 

Wunís myrûí

/wunis myɾʌi/

breath burning

Breath burning

 

(instrumental)

 

pilu ní

/pɪlu ni/

center.of.flower clear

Clear center of a flower

 

uka

/uka/

Companion

 

Be ŕíky zöet

/bɛ ʐi-ky zø-ɛt/

neg expel-imp trust-abs

don’t expel trust

 

Despyxa

/dɛspyxa/

Paper of tissue

 

Moías

/mɔias/

Tapestry

 

Kaíkr̂ŭ ŝala

/kaikʂɯ ʃa-la/

warmth.from.light petal-instr

Warm light through the petals

Conlang/conculture: Ori(krindia): (temples, quick note on ‘s’, independent pronouns)…

Alrighty.

I am posting some photos of cliffs and mountains like this, since this is how I envisage some of the Orikrindian temples appearing, situated high in the mountains and built into the rock itself. My feeling at this point is one of their primary deities of their pantheon is a mountain goddess who is seen as a mother, supporting and giving life to many other smaller gods who represent entities that dwell on or around the mountain. I know there is a god that is represented by fire/volcanoes, since those are everywhere in Orikrindia. Somehow I want connect the fire god/mountain goddess in a kind of symbiotic relationship. I’m not sure how yet.

~

One more small note on noun cases: I failed to mention that any nouns ending in -s are a little different. I noted that nouns ending in stops (oral or nasal) got an epenthetic -i- inserted before the main case ending for their class. Other final consonants like -r and -l do not. -s however is a little different. In certain respects, it follows the pattern of -l and -r in that it doesn’t get an epenthetic -i-, but in other instances, it does. See below for examples. Note which cases use the epenthetic -i- and which do not.

Inanimate noun: holis ‘door’

Animate noun: selis ‘teacher’

Celestial noun: tus ‘beam of light’

Abstract noun: lyos ‘grief’

nom sg: holis-is OR holis-∅; selis-is/selis-is; tus-ya; lyos-yal

gen sg: holis-ni; selis-ire; tus-sye; lyos-sye

dat sg: holis-im; selis-te; tus-ilya; lyos-lu

acc sg: holis-t selis-t; tus-pya; lyos-pya

loc sg: holis-il; selis-le; tus-cya; lyos-cu

instr sg: holis-ir; selis-in; tus-cya; lyos-ce

voc sg: holis-ca; (all use -ca)

nom pl: holis-sa; selis-sa; tus-ta; lyos-ta

gen pl: holis-ni; selis-si; tus-na; lyos-nya

dat pl: holis-mi; selis-ti; tus-lo; lyos-bi

acc pl: holis-tyin; selis-tyan; tus-ig; lyos-gya

loc pl: holis-len; selis-ic; tus-id; lyos-tya

instr pl: holis-ip; selis-int; tus-id; lyos-tya

voc pl: (all use -ca)

~

So we have looked at the case system for full nouns of all classes. Now it is time to look at independent personal pronouns. Ori does mark the subject of the verb as a suffix, but it also includes personal pronouns that are not attached to the verb. See the chart below for how these pronouns exist in each case. Note that third person pronouns are irregular, and also that they exist differently for each class.

These pronouns can be made reflexive by the addition of the suffix -(i)cye:

canicye iyum cyan ‘I saw myself’

Example of pronoun use:

Cala ipalnda ‘I like them’ (lit: they are pleasing to me)

Tan yubru! ‘We see you!’

Elya abarita tresita ummultu ‘In them all blessings lie’

Maropye en eun! ‘Give it to them!’

Lye-trumat suhit ryesubru cyan na tyeli ipalir cyan ‘We sipped the red nectar and it pleased us’

Eu lye-tepet maroi cyan ‘I gave her the fruit’

 

~

Mintaka

Conlang: Ori (nouns and their cases)

Last time I told you about more Ori verbs and how to conjugate them. Now I will move on to nouns. As I’ve mentioned before, Ori nouns come in four classes (like grammatical genders): animate, inanimate, celestial, and abstract. Ori has noun cases that suffix to nouns to show their grammatical role in the sentence. There are singular and plural, and different cases depending on the class of the noun. Below are the case endings for singular animate and inanimate nouns. The column that says -C stop contains suffixes for nouns that end in an oral or nasal stop (-t, -p, -c, -b, -d, -g, -m, -n). These nouns get a little epenthetic -i- inserted before the case suffix, as you can see below.

  • Note that the blue shaded rows are where the cases for both animate and inanimate are the same.

Screen Shot 2018-06-18 at 6.12.11 PM

So what do these cases mean?

Nom = nominative: this marks the subject of a verb. Example: tu-porin-is merir ‘the shepherd is dancing’

Gen = genitive: nouns in the genitive case show possession or relation. Example: lye-bus tu-ema-re ‘the house of the woman; the woman’s house’

Dat = dative: nouns in the dative case are the indirect object of a verb. In English, this would be often marked with the preposition to or for. Example: maropye tu-porit tu-ema-te ‘give the sheep to the woman’

Acc = accusative: nouns in the accusative case are the direct object of a verb. Example: tepe-cyepu cyan ‘I took the fruit’

Loc = locative: nouns in the locative case show that something is located in, at, or on a thing. Example: bu-le ummum ‘I am staying at home’

Instr = instrumental: the instrumental case is used to show that something was done by means of some noun–that this noun is the instrument. Example: restin-ir lye-holist ayalnda ‘they are opening the door with a key’

Voc = vocative: this case is used when you mean to call out to someone or something. Example: Oa, porin-ca! ‘Hey, shepherd!’

The cases for other classes (singulars and plurals) are below.

Screen Shot 2018-06-18 at 6.30.30 PM

Screen Shot 2018-06-18 at 6.31.15 PM

So let’s look at some examples of these cases in action–in actual phrases and sentences.

Hilucul-ya bellu ‘The sky is wide’

Caru-s roru-sye ‘A world of darkness’

Sesta-lu maro ‘Give [something] to life’

A hilacul-ca! ‘O, heaven!’

Yupye ti-yutar-pya! ‘Look at the cloud!’

Hustu-ce ‘by means of trust’

Hilacul-cya ‘in the sky’

Bu-s ti-hiluma-na ‘a house of the priestess’

I’ll have more examples of Ori sentences soon…

 

Mintaka