Translation practice in Rílin

I’ve been doing more practice translation for Rílin, to fill out any needed grammatical or lexical gaps. Here is a recent one, taken from here.

English: “That is the city of the Goyanim. They are a strange people. They light their cities at night, as if the stars weren’t sufficient for their needs. They fight and kill each other, not realising the greater danger beyond their small world. And they do not hunt each other with bows and arrows. No, they have strange devices that kill from far away without arrows. And take care near their strange iron horses they use to travel. They travel faster than any natural beast ought to, and ignore the strength of the bow and arrow. Best if you avoid their cities, my son.”

Rílin: “Tañ yẃäp Góyanimenmu. Be’a li apen. Xavéjalapen tañ yẃäpet bänkasla, do be hyzû bín kuan. Ŝílapen apenset a zansalapen. Be mílulapen bí gaŝ krur̂ûet dexe ẃy kalumla apenmu. Be siŝulapen apenset kótûñla a ítäla. La, lykylapen be’a mönet baes zansalapen róŝó ŝa ítänla. A toroky né lí mu be’a ǵasíaínla zar̂mí baet lykylapen níñgíle. Zaílapen psötar̂ó dexe gölhañ ŝutréla, dexe lhyntíla kótûñmí a ítämí. Ptatí histä tañ yẃäpenet, mävû.”

I imagine a Rílin father telling his son about a culture with more advanced technology (possibly Tosi?). I may do an interlinear gloss but for now, it stands as-is. More to come.

Conlang: Ori (relative clauses)

A bit ago I introduced some interrogative, indefinite, and negative pronouns for Ori. Related to these forms are relative pronouns, which are used to create relative clauses.

In Ori, relative clauses are head-initial, despite the generally left-branching (head-final) nature of Ori. This means that the head of the relative clause (the main noun) is placed before the relative clause (as it is done in French or English, for example).

The relative pronouns are basically all formed from verions of the interrogative pronouns, but with an additional suffix of -a at the end of the word.

nalar – ‘who?’ –> nalara ‘who’ (rel.)

nabel – ‘what?’ –> nabela ‘which, that’

nanye – ‘where?’ –> nanya ‘where’ (rel.)

nasya – ‘why?’ –> nasya ‘for which reason’ (rel.)

natin – ‘how?’ –> natina ‘in which way’ (rel.)

nalin – ‘when?’ –> nalina ‘when’ (rel.)

The trisyllable forms of the relative pronouns (nalara, nabela, natina, and nalina) also have short forms that are used more commonly in eveyday speech.

nalara –> na-

nabela –> naba-

natina –> nata-

nalina –> nana-

~

Relative pronouns take the same case that the shared noun uses in the embedded clause. In the below sentence,

Tu-hema-s na-s tet lyen-besorpa-tan nimas rya

def.art-woman-nom who-nom makes def.art-clay.pots-acc mother-nom be

‘The woman who makes the clay pots is a mother’

Lye-besorpa-s naba-t elucu-m cyan truma-s rya.

def.art-clay.pot-acc which-acc choose-1sg pst.perf red-nom be

‘The clay pot that I chose is red’

nanya, nasya, nalina/nana are all often used without a case marker at all.

Ti-trente-cya nanya ti-hiluma-pya peli-t cyan culim-bru alinda.

def.art-temple-loc where def.art-priestess-acc find-2sg pst.perf travel-1pl tomorrow

‘Tomorrow we will travel to the temple where you found the priestess’

Upcoming works are brewing…

I’m writing some mini-stories about Orikrindians that I will probably post in the future. Topics may/will include:

– An Orikrindian girl who leaves her country at age 15 and moves to Quarios, some of her thoughts, motivations, and memories (telling her story in retrospect)

– Two Orikrindian brothers who are separated due to a war with a neighboring country

– A story of the devotees of the mountain goddess and fire god who go on a pilgrimage to a great mountain. Fewer will descend that those who went up

I’m also recording new poems in Rílin now, since I am finally back in touch with my h4n Zoom audio recorder, which is higher quality than my laptop mic, unsurprisingly.

Other topics in the works: more Ori grammar, the Orikrindian pantheon, and info on Orikrindian artisanal works.

This has been a semi-update with a bunch of teasers…but I’m really excited about what I’m working on so it’s ok. 😛

Mintaka

A song in Rílin (Bve Pfa R̂í)

So this is a song I recorded a long time ago (like ten years ago lol) that I wrote even longer ago in Old Rílin and Rílin. I was originally inspired by the lush vegetation in southern Georgia when I was visiting there a long while ago. The first verse is in Old Rílin and the rest in Rílin. I imagine it could be from the perspective of a Ríla visiting a southern country (as they are native to the northern half of Izoi and thus would not have experience with certain types of biomes, perhaps being very impressed by certain plants and trees as I was).
Composition, vocals, and lyrics are all by me. Piano arrangement and performance credit goes to Eric Barker (www.ericbarker.com).

http://www.whitealicemusic.com/music/BvePfaRi.mp3

Lyrics are below:

 

Bve Pfa R̂í

(old Rílin)

 

Bve Pfa R̂í

/bve pfa ʂi/

tree blue yearn

‘yearning green’

 

Goxe

/goxe/

stir

‘stirring’

 

bi-ly

/bi’ly/

seed-push

‘seeds springing forth’

 

bil-i

/bi’li/

innerground-wet

‘moist soil’

 

naqa r̂í

/naqa ʂi/

gentle yearn

‘gentle yearning’

 

na genk

inf sleep

‘to sleep’

 

re kanad

/ɾe kanad/

out.of forest

‘out of the forest’

 

be

/be/

smile

‘a smile’

 

(modern Rílin)

 

Phala tösh

/ɸa-la tøʃ/

air-instr ash

Ash in the air

 

Aghu

/aɣu/

Blind

 

Wunís myrûí

/wunis myɾʌi/

breath burning

Breath burning

 

(instrumental)

 

pilu ní

/pɪlu ni/

center.of.flower clear

Clear center of a flower

 

uka

/uka/

Companion

 

Be ŕíky zöet

/bɛ ʐi-ky zø-ɛt/

neg expel-imp trust-abs

don’t expel trust

 

Despyxa

/dɛspyxa/

Paper of tissue

 

Moías

/mɔias/

Tapestry

 

Kaíkr̂ŭ ŝala

/kaikʂɯ ʃa-la/

warmth.from.light petal-instr

Warm light through the petals